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tv   CNN Newsroom  CNN  January 4, 2010 1:00pm-3:00pm EST

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>> everyone's having to make really tough choices but if we desperately need more time, not less, when hawaii said their answer to this tough fiscal problem was to eliminate 17 days of school, 10% of the school year, no one else has proposed that kind of answer. there has to be a better way. >> reporter: but last week, hawaii's republican governor linda lingle rejected a move by the teachers union and state education officials to restore seven days to the public school's calendar. >> i get the day off. >> so it's not so bad for you. >> no, but. >> he's honest. >> i get a day off. >> reporter: mom worries while the politicians slug it out, the testing scores of her son and others will suffer come spring. >> the biggest person that's being hurt are the students and i think you know, when it comes to education, it should never be touched or cut back. >> reporter: with so many states cash strapped right now, others across the nation may start following the friday furlough
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model, but lela gentry told us she hopes they resist that temptation and find other places to cut. ed henry, cnn, honolulu. "cnn newsroom" continues right now with kyra phillips. >> thanks so much. we're pushing forward. you know after the christmas day near blowup over detroit getting on a plane would get more complicated. where you're from and where you're flying through carries a lot more weight now. the thrills of vickery, the agonies worse than the defeat. sometimes star athletes pay a heavy heavy price for their fame and glory. and you could call it will her row inshooting for dummies. a legitimate how to guide for an illegal drug, seriously? hi, everyone. you knew this was coming. here it is. new rules to protect you in airports and in airplanes. starting today, air travelers from certain countries face extra screening including body scans and patdowns. they apply to people flying
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through four countries. the state department says sponsorer terrorism, cuba, sudan, syria and iran. also included, people flying into the u.s. from saudi arabia, nigeria, yemen, and seven other countries of interest. joining us now with his take, former counter-terrorism official larry johnson. you know, larry, i read your piece today that came out. you are harsh. you're saying this is a bone head move that will likely increase the chance that terrorists will succeed. you say this is half assed security and will get people killed and say this is not even security. this is a joke except it's not funny. wow. your words are strong. >> well, kyra, this is a senseless policy. why don't they have everybody wear a red sock on their left foot or baseball caps backwards? note that the countries that don't appear on this. you don't have egypt. the number two guy in al qaeda zawahiri, is still out there. you don't have mali or niger.
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the fact of the matter is, let's recall that when the 9/11 hijacking took place, those hijackers some of them started from europe. some of them started from small airports up in new england. at that time, we had different levels of security predicated on the notion we could anticipate what the threat is. we know now that's not the case. the only defense is to have effective security procedures that it doesn't matter where you fly from, it doesn't matter what country you're from, it doesn't matter you know, any part about your personal identity. what matters is that you have a security procedure in place that will prevent an explosive or weapon from being placed on board an aircraft. >> so bottom line, larry, are we just not getting the security thing right, or is al qaeda, members of al qaeda so smart enough that they continue to figure out where our gaps are and they hit them? >> i never sit around and worry about the intelligence of the bad guys. i always assume the worst. assume the bad guys are smart
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and they will do things right even if they don't. what we do know though is an effective layered security procedure, which involves technology, which involves profiling and i'm not talking about saying whether or not somebody's an arab or a muslim and you identify them, but profiles that identify habits of travel and other things that provide indicators about somebody, when you put the technology, the profiling, and some other security measures together, then you have an approach. what this is doing is already identifying for the bad guys here are the 14 countries you have to worry about. as long as you're not one of those countries you can do a work around. we've already seen al qaeda do that. we know there are al qaeda members from uzbekistan, from georgia, from mali, from niger, from egypt. so enough with this silliness that somehow we're going to anticipate the intelligence in advance and get it. that's setting an expectation that's way too high. >> so let me ask you this. do we have the right people in charge of our security when it
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comes to flying? is the tsa the right organization with the right people or should the tsa just be done away with and some different type of intelligence group take over our security when it comes to flying? >> this is not a problem of switching agencies. this is a problem of leadership at the top. right now, the people that are running tsa are doing a disservice to the traveling public and putting them at risk. >> we don't even have a head of the tsa, larry. >> there's an acting head. there was a head of the tsa during the entire bush administration when this was allowed to continue. this didn't just start under barack obama. this has been going on for the last 12 months here but it was going on for the previous seven years under the bush administration. it was not fixed after 9/11. they will fixed some of it. they did start requiring checked baggage to be screened for explosives. that's good. they did put security professionals in charge at the security screening checkpoints. that's good. but they left some other gaps
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particularly the issue of detecting explosives on board a person or in carry-on luggage. >> larry johnson, appreciate your insight. we did reach out to the tsa and did not get a comment for this interview. larry, thanks. we're keeping our eyes on las vegas. two law enforcement officers down and wounded one suspect fatally shot in the head. chaos this morning after a gunman opens fire in the lobby in a building that houses federal courts and the offices of senators harry reid and john ensign. a witness reports hearing 30 to 40 gunshots. right now we're waiting for news on the victims' condition, one of them a deputy u.s. marshal, the other a court security officer. no word yet on that gunman's identity or possible motive. does a new year mean a new year for stocks. we're going to check out your portfolio. and this was a big day for wall streeters. back in 1865, just after new year's, the new york stock
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wall street is getting a fresh start today and thank goodness. 2000 through 2009 was the worst decade for stocks on record. now we all want to know what the new year holds for investments.
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susan lisovicz hopefully will give us a good sign. triple digit gains? >> happy new year, my friend. >> happy new year. >> it's been a terrific start on this first trading day of 2010. first of all, we saw a global rally. why is that? china had a very strong manufacturing report. what does that have to do with us? well, china makes things because people want them. you know, we as americans buy a lot of things made in china. that was followed up by a strong report on manufacturing in europe and here in the u.s., suggesting global recovery. so the bulls took off at the opening bell. and haven't looked back. you talked about the lost decade, kyra. 2009 was a terrific year for stocks when the u.s. economy narrowly averted depression. remember though, we are still a ways off from the all-time high. the dow off more than 3700 points from it's all time high just a couple of years ago.
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what's it going to take for this positive momentum we saw in '09 to continue? well, consumer spending outside of stimulus, jobs. these are important things, historically when the stock market comes out of a bear market, it's usually a pretty good year and this first trading day, pretty good so far, kyra. >> well, this i guess is a pretty good omen for the so-called january effect you tell me about every year. >> that's right because every years, i consult the stock traders almanac. sometimes i feel like a sports reporter. there's so many stats in there. this one is remarkably accurate. the january effect, specifically the first five trading days of the year have been right -- they have a 90% accuracy rate from the 1950. and so why is that? well, one of the reasons why is you often see new money at work, pension funds, big funds reinvesting money, putting money at work. there is a sense of optimism. it's not happening, it's an
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early warning system for what happens the rest of the year. so let's hope that the next four trading days bear this out that we're going to see morallies. but this one is terrific so far. kyra. >> let's hope it sticks. thanks, susan. >> you're welcome. >> just a kid or so it seems when you see his photos. the u.s. says this is the face of an al qaeda terrorist. if he is, how did he get there? we're digging deeper for answers. if you've had a heart attack caused by a completely blocked artery, another heart attack could be lurking, waiting to strike. a heart attack caused by a clot, one that could be fatal. but plavix helps save lives. plavix taken with other heart medicines, goes beyond what other heart medicines do alone, to provide greater protection against heart attack or stroke and even death by helping to keep blood platelets from sticking together and forming clots. ask your doctor about plavix. protection that helps save lives.
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. chad meyers, happy new year. welcome back. what's going on at ronald reagan national airport. >> power outage. and people are not getting through security and planes not getting off the ground either. we still have planes arriving at reagan. you can see kind of coming in here going around the beltway an and up from the south and landing. 34 planes still in the sky to land right now. sean, go ahead and switch that to the departures and the last plane out was air-tran flight, and it is now off the screen. but no planes at all in the air around reagan national because of departures. so they are not allowing them out of the gates. people are telling me they are stuck on the tarmac or near a gate but the plane hasn't left the gate they want to use. so they're stuck there waiting for either a set of stairs to
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come to the plane or of course, eventually get those other planes out of the way. >> keep updating us, thanks. from a yoit young man to a terrorist willing to kill himself, innocence for al qaeda. that's the allegation at least. if it's true, what caused umar farouk abdulmutallab to change? >> in this high school photograph, there is a look of innocence. but behind the impassive gaze, umar farouk abdulmutallab appears to have been deeply troubled and lonely. he was devout, loved his faith. his friends even called him the pope. one of his internet postings reads "how can i really enjoy being with people to whom i cannot express my feelings? they know imus lim, but i see how they don't understand." but he hid his troubles well. quasi was on the school basketball team with him.
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>> to say i'm surprised is a given at this point. i wouldn't have figured him to be a lonely person. >> his blogs, abdulmutallab was longing to get to university. mix with muslims. in the fall of 2005, he got his wish. admitted to university college london. but this conflicted teenager was about to enter a highly charged islamic scene. >> there was a battle of ideas if you like going on on the campuses. >> hassan knows. now reformed he was once a campus radicallizer and influenced the man who orchestrated the killing of the "wall street journal's" reporter daniel pearl. >> on british campuses he would have had exposure to a variety of muslim voices all claiming to speak for true islam. and many of these voices were likely extreme fundamentalist voices who openly advocate no compromise with the west. >> he joined the university's
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islamic society and by his second year, became its president. brako was at a different college in london but his old friend had turned his back on him. he was changing. >> he had begun to where islamic -- to wear islamic clothing, i think a caftan and the matching trousers and sandals. >> reporter: in 2007 under abdulmutallab's leadership, the islamic society organized a week of debate about the war in iraq titled "war on terror," a war that appears to have weighed heavily on him. this is the campus at university college london where the war on terror week was held. a year later, an independent british think tank issued a report on islamic societies at universities like this. they concluded while most students were tolerant, a significant minority supported violence in the name of islam. the few friends abdulmutallab
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did have at university are hard to track down. eventually, we get a lead. we've been trying three days to find one person at the university who knew him well enough who's willing to talk to us and this could be the break through. his name is kasim rafik, the islamic society president just before abdulmutallab. >> is this kasim. >> yes, speaking. >> reporter: i ask about abdulmutallab. >> it's difficult for me to the person i knew and what i've just been reading and seeing in the media over the last three or four days, it's extremely difficult. again it, goes back to the issue of where exactly did this process of radicalization take place. >> reporter: investigators are still trying to figure out where and how abdulmutallab was radicalized. what worries osama hassan is
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that abdulmutallab may have radicalized others. >> there is the worry that he may have a small band of comrades or friends who think along similar lines. >> reporter: nic robertson, cnn, london. and we're getting some new information now out of that shooting that took place in las vegas 8:00 a.m. pacific time in morning. we told you about a deputy u.s. marshal and a court security officer that were both shot at the lloyd d. george federal courthouse in las vegas this morning. we're now getting word that that security officer, the court security officer has died. that's according to our affiliate in las vegas, klas and also the associated press is reporting that. we did tell you the suspect was shot and killed. now we are being told that court security officer has died. we'll continue to update you on this story. other top stories we're following for you right now, five americans in a pakistani court today. they're accused of meeting with militants to plot terror attacks in afghanistan.
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the men deneinvolvement with terrorists. the court gave police a couple more weeks to build a case. atlanta has a new mayor, ca keep reid sworn in a short while ago won a hard fought runoff last month. he replaces shirley franklin. his first priority, making the city safer. houston also has a new mayor. anisse was sworn in and repeating the oath today in public. the 54-year-old doesn't hide the fact she's a lesbian, making houston the largest city in the u.s. to be governed by an openly gay person. architects love it, the newest marvel of construction up and running. when we say up, as you can see, we mean it. chicago's willis formerly sears tower --
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chicago's willis formerly sears tower now second size wise. they're celebrating the official unveiling of the world's tallest
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skyscraper in the uae today. the 160 plus story burj khalifa rises more than a half mile. the cost $8 million per story. some hail it as a monumental achievement, others a monument to excess. stan grant, you'll hear him refer to the building as the burj dubai before it was renamed in honor of the president of the uae. >> it's one small step for man -- >> the year 1969. now 40 years later, here on earth in a city in the middle east man is again reaching for the stars. >> this is kind of a project like first exploration to the moon. okay? nobody can challenge it. >> reporter: the burj dubai translates in english as dubai tower and it certainly towers over what is already a massive
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dubai skyline. this is the senior vice president with samsung construction, a division of the giant korean multinational company that is rewriting construction records with this building. >> that's really, really scary. >> reporter: why? you can see down. >> yeah, yeah. just the bottom of the -- we can see just through the bottom. we can see right through the bottom. >> oh, my goodness. the whole way to the ground. >> yeah, yeah. it's really scary. >> if you fall. >> gone. >> forget it. >> they have 1200 units of the residences and hotel rooms. think about just the one building, one single building. we have just one town. >> samsung has cornered the market in giant buildings. it has constructed the two previous tallest buildings patron nas towers and taipei 101 in taiwan. it's a source of pride for a company whose success is a symbol of korea's development.
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>> i think the korean engineers is very diligent. i think the most brilliant people in the world. >> you're very proud. >> i'm very proud. >> proud of this building and korea. >> dubai is all about first it's all about what is the biggest and what is the most impressive. i'm just leaving dubai mall. that is the biggest shopping mall in the world. if you walk down here and take a look behind me, here is the biggest building in the world. or it will be when it's opened. if you speak to the people who have constructing it, it is not just a building, it is a symbol of korea and what they've been able to achieve and indeed a symbol for all humanity. it is already a tourist landmark. >> it's amazing. it's great. it's 880 meter height is the highest in the world. >> do you look forward to being able to go up there one day? >> sometime. >> in the sweep of human history, the burj dubai may not rank with man on the moon but right now, there is nothing else
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like it on earth. stan grant, cnn, dubai. >> it's the word on everyone's lips today but you won't find it in the dictionary. brr. >> how many rs in that? >> a heck of a lot when it comes to what you're about to tell us. >> depending on if your teeth are chattering or not. 20 degrees below normal all the way from the dakotas and montana all the way down to louisiana, all week. i mean, there's no relief in sight. i know that says minus 20. that's not minus 20 degrees, that's 20 degrees below where you should be. you should be 50. you're going to be 30. say should be 10, i won't draw that one because you can do the math. it is going all the way to the east coast down into florida, down through texas, as well. it's going to be one of those weeks that you just, you can't warm up. it's going to be just, you go, come on, the sun please warm me up.
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park the cars in the sunshine but make sure the pets are taken care of. this is one of those dangerous nights again tonight. minneapolis 10 below. that is 42 degrees below where your water or your skin or your puppy's nose will freeze. get realistic and not let that dog and your kids out all night long in the wind. shelter, please. water please and maybe someplace even nice and warm. >> thanks. ask and you shall receive. and then some. pastor rick warren put out an urgent bulletin to members of his megachurch asking them to dig deep and make up for a $900,000 shortfall. otherwise he said their saddleback church would have to cut back on all the ministerial work. it looks like they'll have to expand that work instead. folks kicked in $2.4 million, almost three times what he asked for. memory loss, depression or alzheimer's disease just part of the job. the hazards of pro football.
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specifically severe brain injuries. can lawmakers make america's sport of choice any safer? that makes our potatoes so special. or maybe the pure water. whatever it is, idaho potatoes are a delicious part of a healthy diet. with zero fat or cholesterol, and only 110 calories, and they taste great. a great value, only about ¢.25 each. always look for the grown in idaho seal. genuine idaho potatoes, from the best earth on earth. for my arthritis, i use
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let's get back to that developing story out of las vegas. cnn has now confirmed one of the law enforcement officers wounded in a shoot-out this morning has died. this was a court security
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officer at the lloyd george federal building. a gunman opened fired there. that officer and a u.s. marshal were hit. a witness described what exactly he heard. >> they were kind of running down the steps toward like the southwest corner of the building. and i saw the one marshal as far as i know how it's a marshal got shot up in the corner of the building. and another marshal ran up and covered him up. and i saw some other police officers started arriving at the scene and coming up las vegas boulevard shooting. and then when the shots kind of subsided, i saw some officers run up and check on that marshal that was apparently hit up by the corner of the building in the front. >> the suspect is dead shot in the head just outside the building. no word yet on a motive. the nfl's regular season concluded last night but the hits keep coming for those tracking serious is football related brain jirs. the latest worry pat white
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knocked out of yesterday's game against pittsburgh after a serious head-to-head collision with a steeler defensive back. he's hospitalized and thought to be okay, but according to miami's head coach, it's not just the pro athletes who need to worry. university of tennessee quarterback jonathan krompton's college career concluded last week in a lopt after he suffered what his father terms a severe concussive injury in the vols thursday night loss to virginia tech. krompton white or the hundreds if not thousands of football players suffer any long-term problems or illects from concussion type injuries, that top pick reached a new audience with lawmakers stepping into the fray of debate surrounding traumatic brain injury. john conyers, the chairman of the house judicial committee convening a follow-up issues on the legal issues relating to football head injuries after a similar symposium last october in washington, d.c. brain trauma and injury
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certainly are not limited to one sporting arena. boxers, skiers, snow boarders and many other recreational sportsmen and women can suffer head first mishaps that could last a lifetime. senior medical correspondent elizabeth cohen live in boston with more. elizabeth, in terms of the nfl, how bad is the problem considered right now? >> you know, i got to say, kyra, i was sort of surprised to go to the nfl site and see that eight players right now are not playing because of head injuries. not just any kind of injuries but specifically head injuries. so that's if eight players at any one time, that is not a small problem. now in, addition, we spoke with a researcher at boston university who's working with the nfl, and he looked at autopsy results of 20 nfl players who passed away. and he found that 19 out of the 20 had some signs of a disease called traumatic encephalopathy which is an alzheimer's like illness.
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one of the things interesting about this is that the signs of this disease like dementia, speech and balance problems didn't show up for like 15 to 20 years after retiring. you can see, 19 out of 20 former players had some brain issues and then the signs didn't show up till relatively late in life tells you one, this is relatively common and two, that this can last a lifetime. >> so is there a way to make football safer? a lot of people are asking that now. >> oh, they are. we asked a researcher at boston university that, and he talked a bit about helmets. there's been a lot of the talk about helmets because the helmets they're using now in the nfl were designed back in the 1990s. they're thinking we've had a lot of good things happen since then. can't we come up with a better way to design the helmets. at universities, they are using different helmets. they're using helmets that will actually record when a player gets hit in the head and will send the impact level and the location back to a computer at the sidelines so that the folks
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back on the sidelines the coaches and all of those folks will know what that player has been through. now, that doesn't make the helmet itself necessarily safer but it allows the coaches to know what kind of injury their player has just had. >> got it. elizabeth cohen, we'll keep following the story. stay with us though. i do have one more question for you about a severe brain injury keeping american snow boarder and olympic hopeful kevin pearce in a utah hospital. maybe you can weigh in on this. a spokeswoman for the 22-year-old says he's still in critical condition. he flipped and landed on his head thursday while training for the winter olympics. he was wearing a helmet and his family via facebook is thanking doctors, friends and fans for their support. so elizabeth, you know, on that note of the helmets, what's your take? we just lost her. sorry about that. we'll try and -- no, are you with us? i'm getting bad intel. >> i am. here i am. >> sorry. all right.
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i just -- i had you and thinking about that story because this morning, everybody was talking about the fact that you know, this was the young snow boarder that was about to take on shaun white who we've had on our air after he won the olympics for snow boarding and now we have this horrible incident or accident rather where he landed on his head. with this kind of injury, you know, what types of conditions could he be facing now? >> well, i think with this kind of an injury, doctors are going to be looking for some of the same things they look for in football player injuries. was there any kind of internal bleeding? will he suffer some of these long-term concussive effects as they're called, you know, god forbid, would he suffer any kind of balance or speech problems or deplengsia problems like you see with the football players. i want to point out one important difference though. he as far as we know doesn't suffer this kind of blow to the head every day. football players suffer them sometimes on a relatively frequent basis.
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hopefully, this is the only time he's had that problem and he should definitely be praised for wearing a helmet because not all young kids do when they do these sports. >> how can you actually recognize if someone is suffering from a concussion in because a lot of times they're just acting like everything is okay. meanwhile, they're having a concussion or having bleeding of the brain. >> kyra, you're absolutely right. sometimes the signs of concussion are big and obvious right after the injury but sometimes you don't know and so parents and others around someone need to pay careful attention. i did a story with a girl hit in the head with a softball and her parents didn't notice for like a week. that's how subtle some of these signs can be. look for headache, dizziness, slurred speech, amnesia and fatigue. i'm going to add one more that i think is the most important. a big change. if your child acts a certain way most of the time and all of a sudden they're acting very differently, that is a sign that perhaps that injury that you thought maybe was a big nothing
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might have been a big something. >> got it. we'll be following that story. elizabeth, thanks so much. we've got new video on that breaking story on the courthouse shooting in las vegas. we'll show it to you right after this break. (announcer) a cold or flu can start fast. it can go from a scratchy throat in the morning. to a cough. to a full body ache... at night. new tylenol cold rapid release gels day and night work fast too. they release medicine fast to relieve painful coughs, congestion and sore throats. so you can rest, day and night. feel better, tylenol cold.
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just when you thought it all went away, turns out there are more party crashers at the state dinner. dan lothian at the white house with new information on a third guest, dan? >> that's right. we've just gotten this information from the u.s. secret service saying that a third individual did manage to come into the state dinner back in november and they were not on the invited list. according to the secret service, this individual did not apparently get into the receiving line to meet or greet the first lady and the president. how was there person able to do it? the service says they went to a
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local hotel where the indian delegation was staying and then came in with that delegation. according to the secret service that, delegation was under the security arrangement of the state department. and so they were in charge of that. that is currently under review and an investigation continues, but certainly an embarrassing moment again for the white house as you know, at that same state dinner the salei had is were able to gain entry to the dinner according to white house and were not on the invited list. there were hearings up on capitol hill. there's been a big fallout, a lot of changes according to the secret service have taken place since then and now this third individual. it's unclear how they were able to come to the conclusion that yet another person had entered. perhaps they were checking some list or checking videotape. we don't note at this point but an investigation continues. >> dan, do we know yet if anyone has been held accountable for this? have heads rolled in any way,
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shape, or form? >> reporter: we do not know. certainly big names have been let go. we know that the individuals who were at the gate at the time who did let the salei had is come in, they were put on straightive leave. we don't know the if they're back on the job at this point. it's unclear if down the road other people will be held accountable for this. certainly the president was not happy with the breach in security and most likely not happy with this latest report that another person was able to gain entry, as well. this comes as this administration is now dealing with the whole terror threat after what happened in christmas day aboard that airliner and now something as simple as this as trying to control security here at the white house, there's another report of a breach from the secret service. so certainly concerns here at the white house about this. >> got it, dan lothian, thanks so much. also we were telling but this courthouse shooting that took place in las vegas, 8:00 pacific time. we are now just getting ceremony video that was posted on youtube
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that includes the sounds of the bullets as they were fired. take a listen. >> shooting outside of a las vegas courthouse. holy [ bleep ]. unbelievable. hell of a morning for jury duty.
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>> now, of course, we don't note, we do know there was a shoot-out with that suspect. and authorities, but we can't tell you how many shots were fired on behalf of the shooting suspect. how many on behalf of authorities that actually shot and killed the shooting suspect. but we can tell that you he did shoot a deputy u.s. marshal and a court security officer inside the lloyd d. george federal courthouse in las vegas this morning. that will court security officer has been reported dead. that coming to us from our affiliate there this las vegas, klas and also the associated press. so right now, the suspect shot and killed. a court security officer killed and a deputy u.s. marshal, still don't know the condition that have individual after that shoot-out that you just heard by a passerby of the courthouse this morning capturing the sounds of those bullets being fired on cell phone. it was just posted on youtube. quick look now at other top stories. first, iran, reports that nearly
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100 professors at tehran university have asked the country's supreme leader to stop violence against government protesters. they signed a letter to ayatollah reported on a pro reform website. iran is telling blackwater employees to leave the country while they still can after a u.s. judge dismissed charges against guards charged in the deaths of 17 iraqi civilians back in 2007. the decision has triggered anger across iraq. it's bad judgment or criminal behavior. the police in the nba have some tough questions for a pro basketball star.
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washington wizards player gilbert arenas facing some tough questions from police today. he admits that he used bad judgment by scoring guns in the locker room at the verizon center. that's not all. here's our susan candiotti. >> guard gilbert arenas is a three-time nba all-star. but his alleged locker room gun antics could get him into serious foul trouble legally. >> i'm a jokester. >> it's no joke. the d.c. police, u.s. attorney's office and national basketball association all say they're investigating. the "new york post" reports arenas and teammate javaris crittenton allegedly drew guns december 21st soever a card playing gambling debt. >> i can't speak on that.
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if you know me, you've been here, i've never did anything violent. anything i do it's funny. well, it's funny to me. >> team owners say arenas kept unloaded weapons in his locker with know ammo a practice they call dangerous and disappointing. quote -- >> i agree. you know, that's bad judgment on my part, you know, storing them here and i take responsibility for that. >> reporter: players are working, there's a great deal of security but away from the spotlight, it's a whole new ball game. some professional athletes own or carry guns saying they consider themselves potential targets and need protection. protection from attacks like that suffered by washington redskins defensive back sean taylor who was murdered in his miami home during a robbery but carrying a gun can be costly even for a celebrity. ex-new york giants wide receiver plaxico burress is currently serving a prison sentence for
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illegal possession of a gun after accidentally shooting himself in a leg at a nightclub. megastars like cleveland cavaliers lebron james and shaquille o'neal create fan frenzy when they hit the court. post-game, fans get up close and personal with their heros. shaq who, would with police in his spare time declined to talk about the arenas incident. >> ask you about the gilbert arenas. >> no. >> neither did lebron james but did he talk about security in general. >> i live in akron, ohio, my hometown. i don't need security. i don't travel with security. one thing i do is continue to make sure my family is always safe. >> straight ahead, smokers in a hough over new cigarette rules, afraid this might make their smokes unhealthy.
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>> there is actually a how-to guide on the right way to get loaded on smack and it's out there for the taking. heroin is illegal, right? we'll push ahead on the story in a while. and the changes on the border changing things big time for big time pot smugglers. hey, don't put anything in my cigarettes, that's bad for me. hard to believe but some smokers
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are saying that regarding fire safe smokes only. you know, the smokes that burn themselves out so you don't burn the house down when you fall asleep? extra layers of paper are there but some smokers say they taste pretty bad, make them sick and, get this, may have chemicals in them that are unhealthy. apparently some people like their carcinogens pure and untainted. as we talk about cigarettes we have to talk about alcohol for balance, right? britain's national health service has this idea on dealing with drunks. if you get so hammered that you have to go to the hospital, you ought to pay an admission fee. the equivalent of $845. cheers! right now it's just a thought. the idea came up after a report predicting new year's eve drunkenness alone would cost the health service up to $37 million. it's where people get what they need, live a better life, right?
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for a while terrorists tried to take it away from them. what it's like now in one of baghdad's most popular markets. we'll look at the back story. you could buy 750 bottles of water.
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or just one brita faucet filter. - ( plinks ) - brita. better for the environment and your wallet.
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a place of commerce transformed into a place of terror, baghdad has struggled to make its markets safe again in the wake of deadly car bombings.
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what's it like now? we have the latest back story. >> you can't get enough of us. we're here every day now. >> it's so incredible, the backstory on fridays, we'll do it monday through friday. >> we both know this marketplace. >> we have our stories of various bombings. >> i was there in february -- it was february 122008 and they had three bombs in this marketplace. killed 70, 150 wounded. >> i was on my way there and they rerouted us. >> it's a mixed sunni and shiite area. you can get a man on the street story there. even know you have to take precautions. here's diana. she did it the other day. >> reporter: with the shorja market in central baghdad, this has been a site of dozens of bombings in the past at the height of the sectarian
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violence. security is an issue for us. we have been asking ourselves on the way back if i should wear the head scarf or shouldn't. this is an area that's sealed off from the traffic. we have to walk about 500 meters to get to the main old part of what is the oldest and most important market in baghdad. this area used to be where a lot of the car bombs went off targeting the shorja market. they have sealed it off to cars. since then one of the security issues has been people placing sticky bombs, they're called, on these carts. that is something you have to be careful of here. i have also found out where we accumulated our security from because they seemed to appear out of nowhere. when we arrived here at the first checkpoint we were told it was a good idea for these guys to come was to make our filming easier.
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that's how that happened. as you can see, i decided it was okay to take my head scarf off and no one seems to be taking much notice, i hope. back in 2007 in february there was a major car bomb at the shorja market. months late aerer, john mccain accompanied by a huge company of attack helicopters overhead, soldiers did a walk-around like i am now and said, this is an opportunity to talk about how security here had got so much better. the merchants were furious because it hadn't. the car bombings were continuing. they felt it was extremely wrong of him to cite it as an area of improved security in baghdad. obviously the situation now is different. security is better. you speak to the merchants and
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they say we feel more confident. sorry. apparently we need to get this picture taken or we have to leave the store. >> one, two, and three. >> thank you very much. we have your card. tell him we have his card. the last time cnn was here was around two years ago. the only thing we could fill then was a quick piece oh camera because of the security issues. our minders who appeared out of nowhere when we arrived here say they want us to leave. so that's it. it's been great to see the shorja market which is a focus of the commercial world in baghdad. it's been great to be able to walk around and see how it really is.
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>> she mentioned john mccain. that was the market he walked through. remember the controversy? >> absolutely. those of us who knew the marketplace were like, what? he was like, look at me walking around the market. >> a hundred guards? >> a hundred marines, snipers, helicopters. it's a beautiful place. you can only spend a certain amount of time on the ground like we do even now. those guys didn't hang around all day. >> we talked about our favorite gifts in the market. the korans in the wood boxes. >> and the alarm clocks and you awake to the sound of prayer. >> that's an interesting gift. see you tomorrow, michael. >> good to see you. >> 2:00 p.m. eastern now. other stories we are pushing forward for you, a rising death toll from a federal building shooting in las vegas. a deputy u.s. marshal was hurt. still not sure who the shooter was or why he fired.
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new rules for flyers today. air travelers from certain countries face extra screening including body scans and pat-downs. they apply to people flying through four countries that sponsor terrorism like sudan, syria, cuba and iran. also included are people flying to the u.s. from ten countries of interest. secretary of state clinton says the u.s. embassy in yem men when security allows. that's not yet. so close it's scary. the failed attempt to blow up a northwest jet liner on christmas day. let's push forward on your security. namely, new measures aimed at making you safe in airports and on airplanes. here are the details. >> as of now, all passengers on flights headed into the united states will be subject to random screening, not the intensive screening that's been in place since christmas day. those flying from certain
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countries or with passports from those countries will be required to go through enhanced screening that could include full body pat-downs, scanning and explosive detection swabs. this according to a new directive and now in effect. the countries include those that are listed by the state department as sponsoring terrorism -- cuba, iran, sudan and syria. the other countries were chosen because of concerns particularly about al qaeda affiliates. they are afghanistan, algeria, iraq, lebanon, libya, nigeria, pakistan and yemen. pilots on in-bound flights can prevent passengers from keeping pillows and blankets in their laps and to limit movement in the cabin. the president's top counter terrorism adviser fanned out across the talk shows sunday to say though there were lapses in sharing intelligence prior to
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attempted christmas attack there is no smoking gun. he rejected comparisons to the failures of communication before 9/11ment. >> it's not like 9/11. these agencies weren't holding back information. >> no turf battles? >> no. there were lapses. the system didn't work the way it should have. i think there were human errors. i want to make sure they tell the presidenten what went wrong. there wasn't an effort to conceal information. >> the president meets with homeland security tomorrow to discuss the short comings that allowed umar abdulmutallab farouk to board an aircraft. >> i understand you have new information with regard to the terror watch list. >> that's right. there is a lot of criticism that abdulmutallab wasn't on a flo
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fly or select list. he was in a larger database of people with concern, people with soft ties to terrorism. we are told by an official familiar with the process that the u.s. has gone back and looked at the lists. it's scrubbed them looking at particular countries and regions and also at the latest intelligence they have about these individuals. we are told they have moved hundreds of people from the larger list into the smaller, more specific list including the select-p list, those pulled aside for secondary screening and those on the no fly list. a couple hundred people moved into a more intense category of scrutiny in the wake of the christmas day attempt to blow up an airliner. >> thanks so much. we'll take a break. more in 60 seconds.
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well, happy new year. four days in and the border city has a dozen homicides under its belt. could be another long year in what some call the murder capital of the world. drug cartels probably not making resolutions to call a truce. u.s. border agents trying out a rule to combat drug trafficking. if it works it might be used in the juarez area as well. if you're a mexican drug smuggler and was busted with fewer than 500 pounds of pot, your small potatoes self would
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be set free. no harm no foul. under the new rule being tested, u.s. agents won't send you back. they will actually turn you over to mexican federal officers. mexican justice would take over from there. does that seem sense snbl some civil rights attorneys think the rule has serious problems. we're going to talk to matt allen in a minute. he's a special agent with the office of investigation or i.c.e. in arizona. we'll get his take on this in a moment. first, let's talk with isabelle garcia with the legal defenders' office in tucson. your thoughts on the new rules? >> well, i think first of all it's a mistake and not true to say that people caught with 500 pounds or less are let go. the federal government turns them over to the state authorities. believe me, our office has many cases of 50 pounds of pot, 60 pounds of pot. so first of all, that's
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incorrect. what i understand the program to be is that those people that are merely present -- in other words, they do not have enough reason to believe that they can prove a case against that person. we're trying to set up a program to basically exit them into a lower standard jurisdiction. i mean, our juris prudence in criminal defense is critical for the protection of our due process rights, human rights. it's not a system of gimmicks. it's a process intended to protect the innocence. for us to now deport and exit them into a lower standard is really not an answer, especially not when our communities are suffering from lack of health care, education, jobs and infrastructure. that's where our priorities should be. >> first of all, we'll get down to those that are busted, deported and set free in a moment because i have a d.e.a.
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agent that will argue that point in just a second and there is proof that many of these drug smugglers have been set free. but getting down to the point that we're talking about civil rights here, i mean, these are smugglers coming over here and just feeding the drug frenzy to addicts, kids, violence, the acts of violence in the united states. many people are saying, hey, this is great. mexico is taking responsibility for those coming across the border causing havoc in the united states contributing to the drug war and coming back to mexico and not suffering the consequences. >> first of all, it's a mistake to just label them all drug smugglers. let's face it. we catch few smugglers. d.e.a. and the other agencies combined have arrests of minor players. people that are starving to death that are willing to cross
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with a car not knowing what's in it and they are promised $100 to cross the road. d.e.a. and other agencies have a lot to cover for. they don't get a true drug smuggler ever. we have serious addiction problems. that's how we should deal with the problem. not similarly a law enforcement problem but a medical issue. we need to begin the road to decriminalzation of drugs. that would reduce violence. that would reduce addiction. that would provide much more resources for a true security for our communities. >> point well made that if americans said no to drugs the smugglers couldn't make money. isabelle garcia, thank you for your side. we'll hear from the dea after this. or maybe the pure water. whatever it is, idaho potatoes are a delicious part of a healthy diet.
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and we're going to talk with matt allen, a special agent with the office of investigations or i.c.e. in arizona. we heard from isabelle garcia, the public defender. matt, what she was saying with regard to the new rules about taking drug smugglers and turning them back to mexico to be prosecuted, she's saying, hey, look, this isn't fair. it's going against their civil rights. that really i.c.e. only catches a few of the drug smugglers anyway, that it's not worth the money and effort. nutshell. >> i think we see this much
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differently than she does. for us, this is a program that focuses on border security cooperation between the governments of mexico and that of the united states. from the perspective of arizona and boots on the ground i will tell you last year the dhs agencies including immigration and customs enforcement and border protection and partners in other agencies seized 1.5 million pounds of marijuana trying to make it way into arizona. this is no small business. the contribution we are making is not small at all. it has a significant impact. the program we are focusing on is a program through which we work with counterparts in mexico and allow them to assert jurisdiction and sovereignty over their citizens when they attempt to smuggle drugs into the united states. one of the things i think both countries recognize is while we often focus on the fact that a crime has been committed at one of our ports of entry there has been a crime committed in mexico. those drugs have been possessed
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in mexico on the way to a u.s. border. both governments have jurisdiction over the individual in question. and when the u.s. attorney's office in arizona makes a decision to defer prosecution, that makes it possible for us to work with counterparts in mexico to present a person for prosecution there under their laws and under their jurisdictional rubric. >> so, matt, let me ask you then if you're a mexican drug smuggler -- because you're talking about a lot bigger -- a bigger load of drugs here. because what has been talked about is if you're busted at the border with fewer than 500 pounds of pot you're deported and set free. are you saying the new rules will not only take those smugglers but also smugglers that are bringing in much larger amounts of drugs, tossing them back to mexico and saying, hey, handle these guys? is that what you're telling me? it will be all types of dealers
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and that they will be handled by mexican authorities in ways they haven't been dealt with before? >> quantity isn't the determining factor. wh it's five pounds or 5,000 pounds how much narcotics is involved isn't a determining factor over whether someone is turned back over for prosecution in mexico. >> what's the determining factor? >> it's whether or not we think we can make a presentation of a good case in u.s. court. if a federal prosecutor in the united states makes a decision that we can't sustain charges in the united states, that popes up the opportunity for us -- opens up the opportunity for us to provide information to our counterparts in mexico to decide if they have enough information to prosecute under mexican law. >> is it tougher to prosecute here than in the mexico? >> it's different. we have a different standard and burden of proof in the united states. it's not necessarily fair to compare the two systems. they work under a different
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constitution and a different rule of law. we're just providing an opportunity for mexicans to bring consequence and accountability to their nationals who violate both their laws and united states law at the same time. >> bottom line, sit going to help smugglers stay out of the u.s.? do you see it as a good thing that will decrease the amount of smugglers coming over the border? >> absolutely. when we can make smugglers realize there is a consequence we have accomplished a goal. >> matt allen from i.c.e., appreciate your time. >> thank you very much. >> they say pot is a gateway drug to harder stuff. we're going to look at information put out by the new york city health department. call it a heroin how-to manual. as billy crystal would say, you look marvelous. the burj khalifa opened a few
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hours ago in the united arab emirates. it's not every day you open the world's tallest tower. and the new york stock exchange with the money angle but mohammed, quite a spectacle. >> oh, absolutely. this was opulence on a grand scale today. this is, of course, the tallest building in the world. it's about a half mile up into the air. everybody that we saw today who came here -- and thousands gathered to cheer. they were happy, singing, clapping. but when the fireworks display happened, they were just awe struck. that was a spectacular display. earlier in the day we took a tour inside the burj khalifa as it is now known. we went to the tallest observation deck in the world on the 124th story and the views
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were spectacular. you saw all around what surrounded dubai and the emirate. everybody here believes though dubai has seen tough times recently and they faced a credit crisis, people here believe this will make them turn a corner. this is a symbol of what the government is investing in this emirate, how they will turn the corner and make everything better. >> let's talk dollars and cents. susan at the new york stock exchange, what do you make of this? >> the timing is not good. less than two months ago we were talking about how the financial markets were shocked that dubai had to be bailed out when it said it needed to freeze $26 million in debt owned by one of the largest government-owned groups. a name we know well in the u.s., dubai world.
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it took abu dhabi to bail it out. there is a real estate crisis in dubai. there is a credit crunch as well. so the timing is not particularly well, but dubai is anxious and ambitious. these kind of projects, as massive as they are started yeergts when things were -- years ago when things were different. >> we'll see how it turns out. other top stories, would you believe there was another party crasher besides the sulahis last year? a third person made it in without being on the official guest list. we don't know who it is yet. but he or she entered with the prime minister's delegation. people supposed to be at the white house have turn returned from vacation. the president and first family touching down a short time ago. president obama expecting a c.i.a. update on the attempted bombing on christmas day.
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president obama said it was rooted in fear rather than fact. now the ban on tourists or travelers suffering from hiv or hiv/aids no longer exists. some say it's long overdue and is a significant move for the u.s. a tough as nails u.s. general in yemen, a hotbed of activity. general david petraeus showing the flag. for my arthritis, i use
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new capzasin quick relief gel. (announcer) starts working on contact and at the nerve level. to block pain for hours. new capzasin, takes the pain out of arthritis. we've hearing the president will huddle with a top adviser and hear about the christmas day plane attempted attack. meanwhile the american embassy has been closed in france, uk
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and yemen. general david petraeus jumped on a plane quickly. he turned up in yemen over the weekend. he's telling them the u.s. wants to help yemen stamp out growing strength there. just today security forces killed two suspected al qaeda militants in a raid northeast of the capital. >> it's a country with a lot of challenges. the hudis in the north and southern secession niss in the south. reduction in oil though gas is going up. a youth bulge. many of the challenges of countries that are in the process of development. rugged terrain, tribal areas and so forth. so very important, indeed that yemen has taken the actions that it has. and indeed that not just the
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united states but neighbors and so forth have provided significant assistance. >> the u.s. plans to more than double the terror fighting aid shelled out in 2009. it's not just uncomfortable, it's down right dangerous. cold temperatures, new record lows in areas. chad myers is tracking them for us. it was cold this morning here. >> it was. the cold air is still going down to florida. we talked about the possible citrus freeze down there. tonight won't be the coldest night as parts of florida may get into the 22 degrees range around orlando tomorrow night. tonight, 26. obviously cold enough, but even colder tomorrow. the cold air in place in buffalo. you got enough snow yesterday. did you see the football game? two feet of snow in perrysburg. the farthest east lake, otswego.
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i had a caribou coffee and they said who do you think the farthest most east lake of the great lakes is. you get to save a dime. it's ontario. >> you always get things right. you're very humble. >> the air continues to go south. that's the problem. as we look at departures from normal and don't look at the numbers as air temperature. this is departures from where you should be. minus 20. say you should be 30. subject too subtract the number and you get it. ten. to lakeland and into orlando in the lower 30s tonight, but probably the lower to mid 20s tomorrow. that will cause citrus problems for sure. even from northern florida to
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lake okeechobee you want to make sure your pets are taken care of across the country. >> thanks, chad. shooting up heroin isn't anyone's idea of safe but city taxpayers are showing people how to do it safely. when you hear a click, ( clicking ) you know it's closed and secure. that's why hefty food bags click closed. hefty! hefty! hefty! so you know you've helped lock in freshness and lock out air... to help prevent freezer burn. be sure it's secure with hefty food bags. just one click and you know it's closed. hefty! hefty! hefty! ( click, click, click )
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a court security officer is dead and a deputy u.s. marshal wounded after a gunman opened fire inside a las vegas federal building at 8:00 a.m. local,
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three and a half hours ago. the first shots coming in the lobby of the federal building and a shootout on the street. a witness captured some of it on his cell phone camera. take a listen. [ gunshots ] >> shooting outside of a las vegas courthouse. [ gunshots continue ] >> holy -- [ gunshots continue ] >> unbelievable. hell of a morning for jury duty. >> u.s. marshals taking on the gunman shooting him in the head and killing him. no word on an i.d. or possible motive. outrage in iraq over a court
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ruling in the u.s. a judge threw out the case against five blackwater guard accused of killing 17 iraqis. iraq's prime minister says any contractors for fr the firm left in baghdad need to get out of town. iraq is also suing. here's more. >> reporter: 17 people died here in september 2007 when contractors from u.s. security firm blackwater unleashed a bloodbath in baghdad's square. they said they came under attack though investigations by the iraqi government, the fbi and pentagon found there was no provocation. the families of the victims have been waiting ever since to see blackwater brought to account. a hope that was dashed on new year's eve when a u.s. judge threw the case out because of major missteps in the prosecution's case. hassan selman was wounded in the shootings. he shows me how four blackwater suvs blocked the street with helicopters overhead. after 15 minutes with traffic
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backed up, the firing began. [ speaking in a foreign language ] >> reporter: they started shooting at all the civilian cars. those who left their car were shot dead. he was shot in the arms, chest and back. when he tried to drive off he claims one of the helicopters chased him and fired at him, hitting him four times. he's appalled the men who attacked won't go on trial. [ speaking in a foreign language ] >> reporter: i thought the american justice system was fair and impartial, he says, but apparently it's not. the government says it will sue blackwater itself and is pressing for appeal. the company which changed its name to z was banned from iraq after the incident. now the government says any ex-bla ex-blackwater officers in country should leave immediately. >> instructions have been given to check if there is a blackwater member, i advise him to leave iraq and not to stay in iraq anymore. >> reporter: dismissing a court ruling on technical grounds on n a far away country makes little
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sense, especially not to those who lost relatives in this square. it does nothing to help the fragile relationship between iraqi people and the united states. on the first nation's tv screens in the streets of baghdad, iraqis voiced anger and disappointment. >> translator: we call on the american government, its president, its society to bring back the rights of iraqis killed in cold blood. >> translator: the iraqi government should ask for an international court to try them in order to honor justice and compensate the families. >> reporter: but nothing can compensate for the lives lost in the square. this year, those who lost loved ones in a hail of blackwater's bullets are still crying for justice. diana magnay, cnn, baghdad. >> the census bureau is kicking off a new media blitz. decision to millions of forms being mailed out, hundreds of
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events are scheduled. the goal is goat you to stand up and be counted. if you don't fill out the form you will get a postcard. if you ignore that, a census worker will come knocking on your door. figures determine how congressional districts are drawn up and how many seats each state gets. that's used to distribute more than $400 billion in federal funds to state, local and tribal governments. so many arthritis pain relievers --
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checking top stories now, kev kevin pearce was doing a twisting double back flip when he landed on his head last week. he had on a helmet wu suffered a severe brain injury. he was preparing for next week's olympic qualifying trials. two big cities under new management today. atlanta has a new mayor and so does houston. parker breaks new ground as houston's first openly gay mayor. mega church leader rick warren has a reason to be thankful. he asked parishioners to make up a short fall in the church's budget and they came through. so much so that warren's cup run next time over. they donated $2.4 million. the donations were all under $100. the creators call it "take charge, take care" but a lot of folks call it heroin for dummies
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i.'s a guide from the new york city health department. on the face of it, prevent over dose, treat overdose, et cetera. but check the details. use with someone else. sounds like recruiting a friend. wash your hands with soap and water. use clean tap water to prep your stuff, and on and on. doesn't seem applicable to street addicts. did i mention it was paid for by city taxpayers? here the to talk about it, from the chemical dpependency institute and on the phone, the head of the new york field division. don, let's start with you. tell me about the manual. you think it's a good idea. why? >> yes. our society has to deal with drug problems. the main point in the manual is that people should seek treatment for their drug problems. but we know that there will be people injecting today and tomorrow. we need to find ways to reduce the spread of infectious d
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diseases among people injecting drugs particularly to reduce the spread of hiv and the pamphlet addresses that. >> it does, but, john, as you know it also gives a play by play on how to inject heroin, quote/unquote, safely. what's your make of this? >> i would say it gives information on how to inject heroin with less risk rather than safely. i don't think you can inject heroin safely, but clearly if you follow the information in the pamphlet it would reduce your risk, particularly your risk of getting hiv and then spreading hiv to others. >> john, sorry about that. don and john sound similar. john, i want your response from a dea perspective to the manual. and of course what don has to say. >> yes, thank you. well, the pamphlet, although it provides a couple of good points like a 1-800 number to call to stop using drugs, basically the
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pamphlet is a how-to of how to use heroin. this pamphlet enables the heroin user and sends out the message that using heroin can be safe. that is not an accurate message. using heroin can never be safe. it is basically putting poison into your body and it is akin to playing russian roulette with a loaded gun. so to have a pamphlet that sends out any type of message to our youth or even to adults that using heroin can be done safely by cleaning a needle or, as you said in this pamphlet, it describes to bring a buddy with you. so not only are you putting out a pamphlet that says use heroin -- which is illegal. it is a poison. it also says, hey, bring a friend along with you. >> don, it's pretty direct if you look at tip five, for
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example. it says how to prepare the drugs carefully. i looked at the pictures, read the directions. i have to say, it made my heart beat quick reading this. tip six, take care of your vooinvooi veins, how to inject it just right. it seems like it's showing them how to help their addiction or kill themselves safely? >> i think the word "safely" is wrong. the pamphlet says "safer." this is about reducing the risk of infections. reducing the risk of getting hiv. the main message of the pamphlet is to try to seek treatment for your drug problems. that's really the preferred solution to the problem. but it's not the only thing we need to do. we do need to stop the spread of hiv among people who inject drugs and this pamphlet gives
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good practical advice on how to reduce your risk of getting hiv. >> well, don, let me ask you. do you have the proof that this manual has actually helped save lives, that you have actually been able to prevent an increase in hiv cases because you have handed out this manual and watched people use it? >> this manual is part of a much larger effort that includes face-to-face community outreach, includes the syringe exchange programs, increased drug abuse treatment. since we have started these efforts, including the pamphlet, but more than the pamphlet, we have seen the reduction of 80% in new cases of hiv among drug users in new york city so that, yes, we definitely know that these efforts to reduce the risk of hiv among people who inject drugs are really quite successful. >> john, you're with the dea and you know heroin is one of the hottest drugs among kids.
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they have the issue with cheese and the fact that kids are starting this stuff and many don't know it's heroin. you can go on the new york city department of health website and print out this manual. can you support this in a way that it's going to save lives? >> no. the problem with the pamphlet is that, again, it leads individuals to believe that they can use heroin in some safe manner. over the last several years in the new york area, we have had several, or many, overdose deaths tribute e deaths attributed to the use of heroin. i challenge anyone to speak to parents of teenagers that have overdosed and died they used heroin, to tell them if there is any safe way that heroin can be used. those parents will tell you, absolutely not. there is no safe way to use heroin whether you are injecting
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heroin, snorting heroin. it is never, ever safe. >> the director of research from the chemical dependency institute and john gilbride. we want your reaction after the break. my doctor said most calcium supplements... aren't absorbed properly unless taken with food. he recommended citracal. it's different -- it's calcium citrate, so it can be absorbed with or without food. also available in small, easy-to-swallow petites. citracal.
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well, if you just listened to the debate we were talking about, it's about this manual, this how-to manual. how to use heroin, quote/unquote, in a safer manner. you heard a dea agent say that's ridiculous, that you cannot use heroin in a safe manner in any way, shape or form. health officials, as you heard, saying, look, it's a way to get those using drugs to not use dirty needles and to cut down on the cases of hiv. as you can imagine, it's controversial. we have received tweets from you. here's your feedback. one tweet says, since the 80s we
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have been fighting against drug use and it's gotten worse. if we can inform safe use then the risk will decrease. this one, oh, my god, what government bozo came up with this and wrote it? and crane color says, better than people spreading disease and it does give info for drug help. beachlife 2 said, not sure what to think about the drug pamphlet. it's equal to educating teens on safe sex. please don't have sex, but if you choose sex, do this. and caroline says, that's awful. start with death and then outline what to do if you continue to use. thanks for your tweets. there are sign it is health of the housing market is still a question mark. cnn money.com poppy harlow is in new york. the mortgage meltdown was the crux of the financial crisis. now there are fears we may not have hit bottom yet.
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>> that's right. not a good thing to start off 2010 with. some fear what we could see ahead are more depressed home prices. some say 10, 15% further than home prices have to fall in the hardest hit areas that have been hammered like california, las vegas, 9/nevada. it would continue the trend since 2006. over 220,000 dollars and the peak of the market, it fell 22% when you talk home values. much worse in some places to the latest reading from november of last year. just about a month and a half ago. analysts say, listen, there is a flood of foreclosures ahead. you have a lot of adjustable rate mortgages. they are about to reset meaning a number of additional foreclosures. one if not the only bright spot in this, as we have seen the prices fall, we have seen sales jump. the latest reading we have on existing home sales is the bulk of home sales here.
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they jumped the most they have in november since february of 2007. so i guess the bottom line here great for buyers who can score a deal. not great for sellers. big housing signs ahead. >> poppy, thanks. plains, georgia wants to be remembered as president carter's hometown, not the one of obama's effigy. , you too. a.j.? (alarm blasting) (screaming) (phone rings) hello? this is bill with broadview security. is everything okay? no. there's this guy - he just smashed in my door. i'm sending help right now. thank you. (announcer) brink's home security is now broadview security. call now to install the standard system for just $99. the provenechnology of a broadview security system
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team sanchez, what are you working on? >> we're going to be working on a couple of things, but the thing that is -- you know, we have all been following this story out of afghanistan. seven cia guys killed. this is the per flexing part of the story. who in the world would let somebody walk in -- can you imagine the clearance you have to have to walk into one of these facilities with the cia and soldiers walking around? somebody walks in with a bomb. he's a suicide bomber obviously. pulls the trigger and blows himself up. kills and maims several people. several cia agents. well, here's the big news. the guy who did it was a double agent who may have been a member of al qaeda. in other words, spying for al qaeda. reports are he convinced the jordanians to let him spy for them as well. he had everyone fooled when he got on this u.s. facility.
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it's amazing. we are drilling down on that and we'll have a bunch of information at 3:00. >> sounds good, rick. it's gotten the attention of the secret service -- an effigy of president obama hung along main street in the hometown of former president jimmy carter, plains, georgia. it was quickly taken down but not before a few pictures were snapped yesterday. local townspeople say they are embarrassed and hope the effigy-hanger is caught. secret service isn't talking about the investigation. no effigiesoshkosh, wisconsin, but there are swastikas. a jewish temple and methodist church discovered with swastikas spray painted on them. charges could be pursued but they don't have suspects. the mess has been cleaned up. it's a great place to visit, but do you want your kids in school there? hawaii, the president's childhood home raked over the coals because of fridays.
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host: could switching to geico really save you 15% or more on car insurance? host: does charlie daniels play a mean fiddle? ♪ fiddle music charlie:hat's how you do it son. vo: geico. 15 minutes could save you 15% or more on car insurance.
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the president and first family are back, adjusting to the cold of d.c. after nearly two weeks of warm hawaii. some school children on the islands are getting extra vacation days because of the budget crisis. you won't see that in the brochure. story now from cnn's ed henry. >> reporter: like many 9-year-olds hunter gentry loves his scooter and is very
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creative. >> hi, my name's hunlter. i'm a chef and a baker. >> reporter: this young hawaiian has already started his own cooking show on youtube. hoping to make it big on "top chef" some day. hunter also has bilateral hearing loss which makes it hard to hear s's and t's at the end of words. special classes help but that's been hurt by a drastic measure by hawaii to cut 17 class days resulting in the shortest school year in the nation to deal with a budget hole. >> when he's missing friday he's missing not only his regular school day like everyone else, but he's missing his one on one resource time with his teacher. >> reporter: leyla is a makeup and wardrobe stylist and her husband is a freelance photographer. they can often work with hunter at home on fridays, but she knows other families have day care issues and she has a second child on the way. >> my time will run thin.
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>> reporter: u.s. education secretary arnie duncan is pushing for an all-year-round curriculum. he's angry this state is going in the opposite direction. >> everyone is having to make tough choices. if we need more time, not less when hawaii said their answer to the tough fiscal problem was to eliminate 17 days of school, 10% of the school year, no one else has proposed that kind of answer. there has to be a better way. >> reporter: last week, hawaii's republican governor rejected a move by the teachers' union and state education officials to restore seven days to the public school calendar. >> i get the day off. >> reporter: it's not bad for you. >> no. >> he's honest. >> reporter: cool, a day off. mom worries that while politicians slug it out, the testing scores of her son and others will suffer come spring. >> the biggest person being hurt are the students.
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i think when it comes to education it should never be touched and they ever be cut back. >> reporter: with so many states cash-strapped others may start following the friday furlough model but leyla hopes they find other places to cut. ed henry, cnn, honolulu. >> that does it for us. see you tomorrow. rick sanchez picks it up from here. making news right now -- is this the future of flying? >> we saw the security chasing after somebody. everybody was yelling. >> reporter: newark airport in gridlock after a security breach. >> with all due respect, this is nuts. >> who is she calling nuts? jim demitt? no. new details on two nbaers who reportedly pulled guns in their own locker room and athletes who say they need to

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